How to Train a Puppy to Sit and Lay Down

How to Train a Puppy to Sit and Lay Down? I wanted to show the guardians how to train a puppy to sit and lay down using positive puppy training.

I wanted to show the guardians how to train a puppy to sit and lay down using positive puppy training.

Easy Tips on How To Teach A Puppy To Sit And Lay Down

Why would you want to teach your dog to sit? He’ll learn that putting his butt on the ground is the best way to get good-stuff-for-dogs and that this is the good default behavior. It’s easy to teach, it strengthens your link, and it’s a terrific alternative to jumping up and a variety of other issues.

To teach your dog to sit, follow these steps:

  1. Get your clicker, treats, and dog and find a quiet place to practice. 2. If you don’t have a clicker, instead of clicking, say “good” or “yeah.” Bring the treat (lure) over the dog’s head so he looks up and back and sits down instinctively to view the treat. Click and treat when his buttocks hit the floor.
  2. If your dog is sitting reliably after about 10 repetitions, lure him into the seat and say “sit” just as he is ready to do so.
  3. Instead of bringing the treat over the dog’s head, say “sit” while making the same motion with your empty hand. If he does, congratulate yourself (give three treats) and take a break.
  4. Continue to practice with the empty-hand motion. This is now referred to as a “hand signal”! If you like, you can fade this out so the dog just responds to the vocal cue. While cueing “sit,” make smaller and smaller hand movements until you no longer need to move your hand for him to understand what to do.

How to Become a Sitting Expert

  • Don’t give your dog treats for sitting when you haven’t asked for them.
  • Request that your dog sit in increasingly distracting environments for 5 minutes twice a day.
  • Play “Go Crazy and Sit” with your dog by running around with him while squeaking a toy and then asking him to sit. Treat success with a click.
  • “Say Please”: When you give your dog something he enjoys, like access to the outside, his food bowl, or stroking, ask him to sit.

Distractions to practice for sitting training your dog include:

Low:

  • Another member of the family is present in the room.
  • You’re holding a hand toy.

Med:

  • During the request, an alarm, doorbell, or phone rings.
  • Inquiring while in a different position (sitting or lying down, with your back to you)
  • Inquiring in a specific location (such as the basement or the middle of the street)
  • You have food in your hand,

High:

  • The presence of people, dogs, or other animals in the immediate vicinity
  • There is food on a nearby table.
  •  You’re at a pet store or a veterinarian’s office.
  • You’re expecting visitors.

Lay down.

Why should you teach your dog to lie down? Down is useful for keeping the dog calm and in one place. It’s also a wonderful alternative to barking.

What is the best way to teach your dog to down?

  1. Get your clicker, treats, and dog and find a quiet place to practice. 2. Ask the dog to sit, click, and treat in the sitting position, then bring the treat down to the floor between his front paws while he’s still sitting. Keep his nose pressed against the treat. If he gets up, start over. Any movement towards the floor should be clicked and treated; this behavior can be challenging, so don’t make him frustrated by withholding treats for too long. An actual jackpot is a jackpot.
  2. If your dog is dependably downing after approximately 10 repetitions, lure him into the down and say “down” just as he is ready to do so.
  3. Instead of bringing the treat to the floor, say “down” while making the same motion with your empty hand. If he does, he wins! Also, take a break.
  4. Continue to practice with the empty-hand motion. This is now referred to as a “hand signal”! If you like, you can fade this out so the dog just responds to the vocal cue. Use smaller and smaller hand movements while cueing “down” until you don’t need to move your hand to get him to understand what you want him to do.
  5. “Practice on the go”: Do this in a variety of settings with varying degrees of distraction. In a new or interesting scenario, don’t forget to expect a little less from your dog.

Solving Issues:

  • “The dog won’t get down!” Don’t try to position your dog with your hands because it will almost always backfire. Instead, when you’re relaxing in the evening, place a special cushion or bed on the floor, grab your clicker, and wait for him to fall asleep on his own. When he does, click and jackpot by tossing the treats in his direction, forcing him to stand up to retrieve them. Repeat. You’re ready to add the word “down” when he lays down immediately after receiving his reward. Try it in another area after he’s done it a few times with the cue down, and then take it on the road!
  • “He falls, but his back rises!” Make sure you deliver your treat as often as possible in the down position.

Developing Downhill Skiing Expertise

  • Stop rewarding your dog for downing when you haven’t given it a cue.
  • Practice in a noisy environment (see “sit” distractions above).

Stay:
Why should a teacher continue to teach? This is a great self-control practice that also has a lot of practical applications, including keeping your dog from running out the door, jumping on people, or simply keeping him motionless as you wait for your vet visit.

After you’ve taught “Sit” and “Down,” try this practice.

To teach your dog to stay, follow these steps:

  1. Get your clicker, treats, and dog and find a quiet place to practice. 2. Wait 2 seconds after cueing your dog into a sit before clicking and treating.
  2. Repeat this process until you can wait 10 seconds between clicking and treating. Begin using the cue “sit-stay” (which really only means “long sit”). Use a hand signal with your flat hand about a foot away from your dog’s face when you say “stay.”
  3. If your dog jumps up, it means you’re moving too fast. When you say “oops,” try again with a lower goal for how long you want to stay and keep increasing it.
  4. Take a half step back and click, and treat your dog for staying. Continue until you can take two steps away from your dog in either direction.
  5. Retrace your steps until you are no longer visible. And work, working until you can get him to stay for two minutes when you’re nearby. (If you’re very ambitious, you could try to combine the two circumstances.)
  6. Start with “down” and work your way up.

Tips:

  • Increase the difficulty of each stay repeat. If the game becomes increasingly challenging, your dog may decide not to participate.
  • Give your dog a treat for staying where you told him to. If you have him “come” after staying, the suspense of his release will weaken his stay.
  • Make it a habit to hold your breath before offering the food bowl, greeting someone, or exiting a door.
  • Don’t become frustrated if you’re having problems; simply back up a step, complete it, take a break, and try again later (maybe with better treats).
  • Practice in the presence of distractions (see “sit” distractions above).

Good luck with your training! Please consider becoming a client or sharing this post with your friends if you found it useful. Thank you very much!